St. John’s Co-Cathedral, Malta

Kon-Katidral ta’ San Ġwann, Valetta, Malta

The Roman Catholic cathedral has been erected by the Order of St. John in Valetta between 1572 and 1577. Grand Master Jean l’Evesque de la Cassière and architect Girolamo Cassar were responsible for a modest building, dedicated to St. John.

However, in the 1660s Grand Master Raphael Cotoner ordered a refurbishing of the inside. Rumors go, this was not in favor of the Maltese knights but to rival the church of Rome. The elaborate golden inside of St. John’s has been designed by the Italian artist Mattia Preti in lavish Baroque style. Unusually, the wood carvings were produced on sight. With all that gold, marble and the intricate wall hangings, this place is absolutely breath-taking and offers an amazing feeling of space. You are also pretty sure this is a Catholic church.

Approximately around 1820, the Arch Bishop was allowed to use this church as well, due to its popularity. Therefore, the Archbishop’s Cathedral at the old capital Mdina is the cathedral, while St. John’s in Valetta serves as a co-cathedral.

There you have it, history in a nutshell. After an hour and a half, I gave up on my audioguide (as there is a wee bit more to all this). If you would really like to make the most of your visit to St. John’s Co-Cathedral, maybe break it up into two?

Happy traveling.

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “St. John’s Co-Cathedral, Malta

  1. Photo 5:
    The little heads look vaguely distressed as they are so overloaded with Baroque gold. If the two small heads could speak, they might say: Help! This is too heavy for me to wear. Please, someone, set me free from behind this ‘gate’ of gold.

    I would like to visit Malta sometime too! So glad you got to go!

    Liked by 1 person

Join in and share your guilty pleasures!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.