Postcards from Lieberose Heath

Greetings from Lieberose Heath and Desert! The federal state of Brandenburg is not really known for being exciting. If you are looking for a quiet getaway, this is the place to go.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

Why does Germany have a desert? Well, I’m glad you asked.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

The Russian army used this area for military practices. After the wall came down, no one really knew what to do with this huge area.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

I’ll spare you the details, which are complex … but to cut it short … on one side of the road lies the Lieberoser Wüste, the desert of Lieberose.

Lieberose Heith Lieberoser Wüste

In this vast space there is pretty much nothing as far as the eye can see. Since the desert is highly contaminated with munition it is not safe to visit.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

On the other side you find the Lieberose Heith. They established walking trails through the area.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

Big parts of the former military area are strict nature reserves.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

A few signs explain the ecological succession. Basically, the part we visited is completely untouched and nature is simply allowed to take over.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

Lieberose Heath hosts 400 different kinds of butterflies, more than 100 kinds of breeding birds and many animals and insects on the brink of extinction.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

OK, it doesn’t really look like a haven for wildlife.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

Different kind of deer, even mouflon, are native here, as well as badgers, otters or racoon dogs.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

Special motion cameras also spotted elks (I’m not making this up) and wolves.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

One of the signs showed a picture of baby wolves. It is all looking pretty promising here.  

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

The Russian army erected a hill and a watch tower, so you are able to enjoy the vast nothingness with a view.

Sukzessions Wald Lieberoser Wüste und Heide, Brandenburg 
bekitschig.blog Berlin

Oddly enough, they bothered to plant roses. I bet they are red.

Lieberose Heath & Desert - old military Ground in Brandenburg, Germany succession forest

The moral of the story is that nature will take over eventually and you can still have fun with everything closed.

Thanks for flying with be kitschig. Have a happy Hump Day!

More odd places to visit

Popeye Village Malta

Road Trip to the Big Lobster

Sunrise at the abandoned resort

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15 thoughts on “Postcards from Lieberose Heath

    1. It was an interesting trip! There are more photos to share but I wouldn’t dare to go to the restricted aera, would I?
      Maybe breaking down concrete is easier than capitalist plastic after all?

      1. Sadly, you’re right. The concrete will eventually disintegrate and crumble away to powder in a relatively short space of time compared to plastic. Some of the plastic is undoubtedly ‘capitalist’ but China still meets the communist quota. Both systems are equally as bad as one another😎

    1. Thank you! The place is truly fascinating. Big parts of it where a true wasteland. Others were just part of the military but not really in use so for decades animals just lived there without much interferance of people. We do need these spaces.
      It’s a crazy place to visit though. No sign, no fancy cafe, not even a toilet 🙂 Fingers crossed it will stay like that!

  1. The first time I was in Berlin was in 1987 and I remember similar watchtowers all over the place. I somehow still can’t believe that the Wall came down… Thanks for sharing these interesting pictures and introducing us to this area.

    1. Thank you Liz! The South East of Brandenburg is an aera many people don’t even know about. It is a beautiful place to visit. Especially the Spreewald.

  2. I like the word Lieberose in that context. Is it actually Liebe-Rose? Lieb-Erose oder Lie-Berose.
    Mhm, need to think about it…

      1. Yes, I heard Müllrose several times, mostly in the context of traffic jam towards Poland.

  3. Interesting post Jeanine – seeing a desert there in your country surprised me, but I do “get” the reason for it. I was surprised there are so many critters there since it is so sparse. Well, that just goes to show that critters are more resourceful than humans sometimes.

    1. Hi Linda, don’t ask me where I read this but it’s supposed to be the 2nd biggest in Europe of its kind. The diversity is fascinating. They connected it to other woods and the animals can roam to God knows where. No one really knows about this place!

      1. Sometimes desolate is good Jeanine … no one knows about it so you get the benefit of roaming about, just like the animals.

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